Solved: How to label a disk in Linux

In this post we will see how to label a new disk in Linux and create a new LVM partition.

Step 1 Scan the new LUNS.

Step 2 List the available disks and identify the one you want to use.

  fdisk -l |grep /dev/ |grep -v dm

Step 3 Use fdisk to label the disk. Here we are using disk sdb .

[root@cloudvedas scsi_host]# fdisk /dev/sdb
 Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.23.2).

Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
 Be careful before using the write command.

Device does not contain a recognized partition table
 Building a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0x909f2c7b.

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sdb: 1073 MB, 1073741824 bytes, 2097152 sectors
 Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 Disk label type: dos
 Disk identifier: 0x909f2c7b

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

Command (m for help):

 

Step 4 Create Primary partition using option “n” of size 200MB.

Command (m for help): n
 Partition type:
 p primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free)
 e extended
 Select (default p): p
 Partition number (1-4, default 1):
 First sector (2048-2097151, default 2048):
 Using default value 2048
 Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G} (2048-2097151, default 2097151): +200M
 Partition 1 of type Linux and of size 200 MiB is set

(Don’t miss the + used before 200M. It’s very critical else it won’t work as expected)

Udemy

Step 4 Now let’s check our new partition

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sdb: 1073 MB, 1073741824 bytes, 2097152 sectors
 Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 Disk label type: dos
 Disk identifier: 0xc1c8c781

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
 /dev/sdb1 2048 411647 204800 83 Linux

Command (m for help):

Step 5 In the above output we can see that the new partition is a standard linux partition.  Let’s Change the partition type to Linux LVM. Here we will use “8e” which is a Hex code for LVM. You can type L to list all codes.

Command (m for help): t
 Selected partition 1
 Hex code (type L to list all codes): 8e

-Changed type of partition 'Linux' to 'Linux LVM'

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sdb: 1073 MB, 1073741824 bytes, 2097152 sectors
 Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 Disk label type: dos
 Disk identifier: 0xc1c8c781

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
 /dev/sdb1 2048 411647 204800 8e Linux LVM

Command (m for help):

Step 6 Finally save the changes with option “w”

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered!

Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Syncing disks.

Step 7 Let’s list the partition table to cross check that our partition table is saved correctly.

[root@cloudvedas /]# fdisk -l /dev/sdb

Disk /dev/sdb: 1073 MB, 1073741824 bytes, 2097152 sectors
 Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
 Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
 Disk label type: dos
 Disk identifier: 0x0aa5ab95

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
 /dev/sdb1 2048 411647 204800 8e Linux LVM
 [root@cloudvedas /]#

 

Cool! So, we have now a LVM partition which we can bring under LVM control using pvcreate. Learn more about LVM in this crash course.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *